Key Auto Glass Terminology

We are always striving to provide the best possible auto glass services possible while educating our customers along the way. These important terms will help you when discussing your auto glass repair with your technician.

  • Adhesive: The bonding substance used to attach your auto glass to your vehicle. At Carolina Windshield Centers, we use Sika brand urethane adhesive.
  • AGRSS: The Automotive Glass Replacement Safety Standards, a set of auto glass repair standards developed to promote safety in auto glass replacement processes.
  • Back windshield: A term used to describe the piece of auto glass affixed to the back of the car.
  • Chip: A small divet or ding in the auto glass that does not penetrate the entire piece of glass and can be safely repaired in many cases.
  • Cure time: The period of time that it takes for the adhesive used in a windshield replacement to completely set. For our Sika brand adhesive, this is about one hour.
  • Drive away time: The amount of time it takes after a replacement until the vehicle is safe to drive.
  • Heads-up display: A visual display on your windshield that has information traditionally found on the car’s dashboard. Most HUDs are projected but there are upcoming models with a screen integrated into the windshield.
  • Laminated glass: The type of glass used by automobiles. Laminated glass is designed to stay in one piece when damaged, reducing the chance of shattering onto the driver.
  • O.E.M.: Original Equipment Manufacturer glass is built to the same specifications that the original auto glass was made. It is often built by the same manufacturer that made your original glass, but is sometimes made by a new manufacturer building to the original specifications.
  • Quarter glass: The small corner of glass usually a part of the rear windows.
  • Repair resin: The resin used to fill in chips or cracks in auto glass repairs. Carolina Windshield Centers uses Clarity Windshield Repair Resin.
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