Heat & your Auto Glass

The relationship between heat and the automobile is something of a constant battle, especially here in North Carolina. Extreme heat can do a number to cars in terms of overheating, tire damage, engine performance, and most other parts of the vehicle.

One area we have the most experience with is of course auto glass. Heat can have a damaging effect on auto glass over time. Auto glass can potentially suffer in cases of severe heat. Already existing cracks in auto glass can spread and expand when exposed to extreme heat.

If you have a small crack in your windshield, you may be in luck. Many small cracks can be repaired, rather than fully replaced. However, if you blast the windshield with the AC during a hot summer day, you very well may need to get a full windshield replacement. That’s because the contrast between the heat and cool air can cause that small crack to spread.

Carolina Windshield Centers has locations across North Carolina. Please contact us for more information about our windshield replacement services!

Taking Care of your Auto Glass

Though many drivers may not know it, your auto glass is one of the most important safety features in your vehicle. However, many drivers do not think to maintain it as they might spend time maintaining other parts of their vehicle. While windshield cracks and chips should always be handled by a professional auto glass repair company, there are some things that you can keep in mind when driving and parking your vehicle.

  • Whenever possible, park your car in the shade. This is overall better for your vehicle, but it is especially smart for your auto glass. Extreme heat in the summer time on your vehicle’s glass can damage your windshield over time. On a similar note, cranking up the heat onto your windshield during the winter can negatively affect your auto glass.
  • Avoid slamming your car doors. We know how kids love to slam their doors, but this can actually rattle your auto glass and potentially stress the glass. It’s also just not good for your car doors!
  • Use a microfiber cloth for glass when you are cleaning your auto glass. Microfiber cloths are meant for cleaning glass and will not scratch your glass in any way. Additionally, ammonia based cleaners will damage your auto glass over time, so you should avoid these products when cleaning your auto glass.

Carolina Windshield Centers has locations across North Carolina. Please contact us for more information!

New Auto Glass Shop in Morrisville, North Carolina

We have recently opened our fourth Carolina Windshield Centers location in Morrisville, North Carolina!

From our new location, our mobile auto glass repair specialists will be able to make on-location windshield repairs and replacements throughout the greater Raleigh-Durham area. We are proud to expand into this new area where we can provide our safe, fast, and convenient windshield replacement services! You can contact our new location at (919) 670-2885.

We also have locations in the following cities:

Charlotte, NC

Greensboro, NC

Hickory, NC

Key Auto Glass Terminology

We are always striving to provide the best possible auto glass services possible while educating our customers along the way. These important terms will help you when discussing your auto glass repair with your technician.

  • Adhesive: The bonding substance used to attach your auto glass to your vehicle. At Carolina Windshield Centers, we use Sika brand urethane adhesive.
  • AGRSS: The Automotive Glass Replacement Safety Standards, a set of auto glass repair standards developed to promote safety in auto glass replacement processes.
  • Back windshield: A term used to describe the piece of auto glass affixed to the back of the car.
  • Chip: A small divet or ding in the auto glass that does not penetrate the entire piece of glass and can be safely repaired in many cases.
  • Cure time: The period of time that it takes for the adhesive used in a windshield replacement to completely set. For our Sika brand adhesive, this is about one hour.
  • Drive away time: The amount of time it takes after a replacement until the vehicle is safe to drive.
  • Heads-up display: A visual display on your windshield that has information traditionally found on the car’s dashboard. Most HUDs are projected but there are upcoming models with a screen integrated into the windshield.
  • Laminated glass: The type of glass used by automobiles. Laminated glass is designed to stay in one piece when damaged, reducing the chance of shattering onto the driver.
  • O.E.M.: Original Equipment Manufacturer glass is built to the same specifications that the original auto glass was made. It is often built by the same manufacturer that made your original glass, but is sometimes made by a new manufacturer building to the original specifications.
  • Quarter glass: The small corner of glass usually a part of the rear windows.
  • Repair resin: The resin used to fill in chips or cracks in auto glass repairs. Carolina Windshield Centers uses Clarity Windshield Repair Resin.

Safe Driving Tips for Fall

Every season brings its own challenges when it comes to driving. So why would Fall be any different? During the fall season, many drivers take to the road for back to school, so you can expect more young drivers on the road in the morning and afternoon.

Fall weather brings certain dangers to driving. Fall is typically a rainy season – couple this with leaves on the road and you can quickly lose control of your car and get into an accident. In order to avoid this, keep an eye on big patches of road covered in leaves. Slow down before you get to the leaves to stay in control.

Fog is also common during the fall season- especially in the morning. You are better off using your low beams driving through fog – high beams cause glare.

Deer are most active during the fall. Avoid deer collision by staying focused and watching for deer crossing signs.

Back to school means more drivers, especially young drivers, on the road. There may also be school buses on the road during your morning commute so you should leave yourself more time in the morning.

 

Carolina Windshield Centers is a leading auto glass repair shop. For more information about our windshield replacement services, contact our Charlotte, NC auto glass shop at 800-900-1505.

The Development of Auto Glass

In 1903, French chemist Edouard Benedictus dropped a beaker filled with dried cellulose nitrate. The glass broke, but it did not shatter. The cellulose nitrate kept the pieces of glass bonded together. Benedictus had invented what would later become the base for laminated safety auto glass. While laminated auto glass wouldn’t be used in automobiles until several decades later, it was becoming apparent that automobiles needed some form of glass to protect the driver’s vision on the road. It was also becoming clear that standard glass that you put in your home’s windows was not going to cut it. Regular glass shatters when broken. This was causing a major issue for early drivers because a simple crack in the windshield would cause severe injuries when the glass shattered.

In the very early days of automobiles, windshields were often sold as an accessory with the vehicle. It was considered more of a luxury to have an enclosed automobile than not. As time went on, however, the frequency of accidents increased and automakers started including auto glass as a default feature. Manufacturers like Henry Ford began putting laminated windshields into his cars and tempered glass in the side and back windows. In the 1960s, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) was formed, and safety glass was made a legal requirement for all motor vehicles.

 

Carolina Windshield Centers is a leading auto glass repair shop. For more information about our windshield replacement services, contact our Charlotte, NC auto glass shop at 800-900-1505.